Other Festival Events

The following lectures and special events were offered during our May 2021 online festival.

Welcome Drinks Party

A virtual invitation into Phillipa’s home for an informal welcome 

Please join us to celebrate the start of our very first online needlework festival. Phillipa and her partner Richard will be joining you on what we hope will be a pleasant Spring evening in Britain with a glass of something fizzy. We invite you to do the same and celebrate coming together.

 

When

Sun 2 May

What time

8pm BST

Price

Free

Jacqui Hyman

Samplers: A Child’s View of Embroidery, their History and Conservation

This lecture outlines the historical and stylistic progression of samplers from the 1600’s. Young children were encouraged to embroider a sampler, to demonstrate needle skills and to act as their reference of stitches and designs. Sadly, many have been vulnerable to neglect but, with appropriate conservation, many are saved.

Jacqui has had the privilege of conserving all the samplers described in this lecture and therefore her personal in-depth knowledge of each is unique. Advice on future care and display of samplers is also included, to ensure that future generations can enjoy their family heirlooms or a piece of embroidered history.

Jacqui’s lecture explores the different aspects of Samplers, structurally and their designs including their fabrics, threads, dyes and styles and how to date them. Some also show embroidered advances in architecture whilst others historical events and for some death, which was never far away in the lives of children during the early Victorian era.

NOTE: This session will be offered twice

Session 1

Tues 4 May at 6.30pm BST

Session 2

Wed 12 May at 12pm BST

Price

£10

For modern audiences, the intricacy and variety of the stitching found in early English needlework continue to astound and delight the eye, and have prompted a number of textile historians to conclude that the Elizabethan and Stuart periods ‘can claim most of what is good in English domestic embroidery’. Equally surprising is the fact that several objects preserved in museum and private collections were stitched by children and adolescents. 

This lecture aims to explore the prevailing attitude towards female education in the 150 years following the Reformation and its impact on the development of English domestic needlework; to give a voice to some of the ‘invisible hands’ who created these ‘curious works’ and to examine the environment in which girls from middle and upper class backgrounds learned to ply their needle, the training they received and the images they chose to stitch.

NOTE: This session will be offered twice

Session 1

Thur 6 May at 8pm BST

Session 2

Tues 11 May at 12pm BST

Price

£10

The story of Lady Anne Clifford

Phillipa will introduce you to our local heroine, Lady Anne Clifford, Countess of Pembroke, Dorset and Montgomery, (1590-1676). 

From her childhood at the Court of Queen Elizabeth I, her youth as a favourite of Queen Anne, her battle to inherit her northern castles, and her later years in Appleby and other Northern castles where she transformed the lives of so many. Lady Anne’s  support for the community in Phillipa’s home town of Appleby has led to lasting social cohesion and co-operation centuries later. Phillipa will show you examples of needlework from the late 16th and 17th Centuries, during Lady Anne’s lifetime.

When

Sat 8 May

What time

6.30pm BST

Price

£10

Hutton-in-the-Forest

An virtual visit with Lady Inglewood 

Hutton-in-the-Forest, a hunting lodge on the edge of the English Lake District in the Eden Valley, offers us a timeline of British history – from its Medieval stone hall to the Victorian drawing-room, fine examples of furniture and textiles are on display. 

We will be welcomed by Lord Inglewood and enjoy a private virtual tour of his family home. Lord Inglewood will then treat us with special access to see some of their prized needlework collection.

When

Friday 14 May

What time

6.30pm BST

Price

£10

Portraits of this period show royal and noble men and women wearing clothes of such richness and complexity that viewers are dazzled – as they were intended to be at the time. This illustrated lecture will help you to identify the individual garments which make up the look and will discuss where the materials came from, who made them, and how they related to the plainer dress of the time.

When

Monday 10 May

What time

9pm BST

Price

£10